The History and Heritage of Kojonup

For many thousands of years before the arrival of European settlers in 1837, Noongar Aboriginal people were the traditional custodians of the land that is now referred to as Kojonup.

They drank from the local freshwater spring and hunted game with the traditional Noongar ‘kodj’, or stone axe. Both Kojonup and The Kodja Place are named after the historically significant implement.

Following the arrival of settlers in 1837, Kojonup became an English Military outpost and, over the next century, evolved into a contemporary farming community.

It was the first Shire in Western Australia to have one million sheep. 

Within any community, people come and go. Some leave their mark in the buildings they create, the businesses they run or the groups they choose to join. Others leave writings or photos.

The Kojonup Historical Society was formed in the late 1960s in attempt to capture something of these lives, for by learning and building upon the experiences of the past, we can understand community in it's fullest sense.

The Society keeps headquarters in the Old Post Office building, one of the many preserved buildings that visitors to Kojonup can enjoy.

Kojonup historical sites and activities


Explore the history of Kojonup by visiting these sites around the town:

The Kodja Place also has many diverse and engaging displays for visitors interested in Kojonup's Noongar (Aboriginal) and pioneer heritage

The Kojonup Historical Society


The Kojonup Historical Society can be contacted via:

Kojonup Visitor Centre

Address: 143 Albany Highway Kojonup WA 6395
Phone: +61 8 9831 0500
Fax: +61 8 9831 0300
Email: kojonupvisitors@bigpond.com

Or use the Contact Us form on this site.
  • Corner of Albany Hwy and Broomehill Rd, Kojonup, 1904. Now the site of The Kodja Place.Corner of Albany Hwy and Broomehill Rd, Kojonup, 1904. Now the site of The Kodja Place.
  • The police station house, 1938. The house survived the 1938 floods and it remains a residence today.The police station house, 1938. The house survived the 1938 floods and it remains a residence today.